Letter from Arndt, Albert

Soldier: Arndt, Albert
Allegiance: Union
Unit/Service Branch: 1st Artillery
Home State: Michigan
Date Written: Wednesday, July 29th, 1863
Location: Corinth Miss
Correspondence Type: Letter
Subjects: Camp Life, Commanders, Comrades, Daily Life, Desertion, Enemy, Friends, Home, Politics, Western Theater
 

Miss M. Howland
Dear Friend

May I beg your pardon again for not answering before: I will not promise any more to improve, neither will I try to make any excuse for not writing before, though allow me to assure you that the less I write to you the more I think of you. I am afraid - that you will think - I am rather mean and careless, please believe little of the last, though not the first if you could see in to my heart - you would think quickly differently - I am all alone, ??? Wright [Edward Wright?] is on detached service so you may think that I have a good deal work to do, besides it is very hot indeed during the days and nights a person feels like resting - A good reason of not writing before today, is also: - I had promised you, to send with my next a sketch of Corinth Miss and Bethel Tenn, they were commenced some time since though was not able yet to finish them, and I will not let you wait any longer. -

In yours you remark that you were again ??? about the fall of Vicksburg - I hope you are satisfied by this time, that it is ours and not only Vicksburg but also Port Hudson - Mobile & Montgomery Ala I hope soon will also ours and if Genl. Meade is successful and takes Genl. Lee's G. Army - by next spring this war may be closed - oh what a blessing it would be, do you not feel anxious to see this glorious day thus will bring the happy News Peace. I confess - I do. What in the world gives the young men the California fever at this time, where we perhaps want them here, or are they afraid of being drafted into the Army?

I wish you young Ladies from Michigan /:and any other State:/ would try to do without a sweetheart during this war, and send every man to help crush down this Rebellion, our Battery is at the present very short on men. - ??? Henry Comptons fathers death, I am very sorry indeed, as I think, that he was a fine old gentleman, though he was not very young any more, and besides, nothing in this world is so sure for us, as "The Death" still we cannot get used to it, and it will affect us to hear a friend of ours has died. - On the 23rd of this month I was obliged to witness an execution. A private named A. J. Johnson of the first Ala Cavalry U.S.A. was shot here on the parade ground, in presence of all force in and near Corinth for desertion. The ground is about a mile square, we were formed thus [sketch] Johnson was marched all around the ground, and then taken in the center, where he was shot, sitting in his coffin by a squad of men from his own regiment ??? - the march was conducted as follows: The provost Marshall Genl. with our other officers was marching a head - then came the music band playing the death march, then came an escort of soldiers, then Johnson's coffin, behind came Johnson, and then that squad of men that fulfilled the execution. I have seen many fall, on the field, though nothing ever affected me as much as this execution - though this man did but receive what was by right due him. The same should be done, with every Copperhead Traitor or Deserter, and it would be better for our whole country.-

I must close to day. - soon more. - ??? Rofs? is all right, but angry that you do not answer her letter, she tells me to give you a good scolding, though I will not do it, ???

Now Miss Margueritie do me a favor and speak with your ma, tell her not to be angry that I have not answered yet I do realy feel sorry and will try to write yet this week.
Also remember me to Mrs. Duncan & to Mrs. Gish??? and Mrs. Moore if you please, as soon as I have time I will write to them.
Do write soon and often you have more time and cooler weather, than I have, and you do not know, how good a letter from you or your ma does me.

Your true and respectful friend,
Albert Arndt
in great haste.

 

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